Monday, November 21, 2016

Learners on the Autism Spectrum: A Best Practice Guide to Assessment & Intervention in Schools



A Best Practice Guide to Assessment & Intervention for Autism in Schools

Fully updated to reflect DSM-5 and current assessment tools, procedures and research, this second edition of the award-winning book, A Best Practice Guide to Assessment and Intervention for Autism and Asperger Syndrome in Schools provides a practical and scientifically-based approach to identifying, assessing, and treating children and adolescents with an Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) in school settings. Integrating current research evidence with theory and best practice, this book will support school-based professionals in a number of key areas including:
  • Screening and assessing children and youth on the autism spectrum.
  • Identifying evidence-based interventions and practices.
  • Developing and implementing comprehensive educational programs and providing family support.
    Each chapter features a consolidated and integrative description of best practice assessment and intervention/treatment approaches for children and youth with ASD. It brings the topics of assessment and intervention together in a single authoritative resource guide consistent with recent advances in evidence-based practice.  Illustrative case examples, glossary of terms, and helpful checklists and forms make this the definitive resource for identifying and implementing interventions for school-age children and youth with ASD.
    This Guide is intended to meet the needs of school-based professionals such as school psychologists, counselors, speech/language pathologists, occupational therapists, counselors, social workers, administrators, and both general and special education teachers. Parents, advocates, and community-based professionals will also find this guide a valuable and informative resource.

    Editorial Reviews  
    “It is rare that one book can pack so many resources and easy to digest information into a single volume!  Families, school personnel, and professionals all need the extensive, and up-to-date tips, guides, and ‘must-knows’ provided here. It’s obvious the author is both a seasoned researcher and practitioner – a winning combination.”
     
    — Dr. Debra Moore, psychologist and co-author with Dr. Temple Grandin, of The Loving Push: How Parents & Professionals Can Help Spectrum Kids Become Successful Adults
    “Dr Wilkinson has done it again. This updated and scholarly Second Edition reflects important recent changes regarding diagnosis and services for students with Autism Spectrum Disorder. With its numerous best-practice suggestions, it is a must-read for school psychologists, school social workers, and those who teach in general and special education.”
    — Dr Steven Landau, Professor of School Psychology in the Department of Psychology, Illinois State University
    “This book is an essential resource for every educator that works with students with ASD! The easy-to-read format is complete with up to date research on evidence-based practices for this population, sample observation and assessment worksheets and case studies that allow the reader to apply the information presented.”
     — Gena P. Barnhill, PhD, NCSP, BCBA-D, LBA, Director of Special Education Programs at Lynchburg College, Lynchburg, VA  

    Availability

    A Best practice Guide to Assessment and Intervention for Autism Spectrum Disorder in Schools (2nd Ed.) is available from Jessica Kingsley Publishers, Amazon.com, Barnes & Noble, Books-A-MillionWalmart.comBook Depository, and other booksellers. The book is available in both print and eBook formats.

    Lee A. Wilkinson, PhD, NCSP is a licensed and nationally certified school psychologist, registered psychologist, and certified cognitive-behavioral therapist. He provides consultation services and best practice guidance to school systems, agencies, advocacy groups, and professionals on a wide variety of topics related to children and youth with autism spectrum disorders. Dr. Wilkinson is author of the award-winning books,  A Best Practice Guide to Assessment and Intervention for Autism and Asperger Syndrome in Schools and Overcoming Anxiety and Depression on the Autism Spectrum: A Self-Help Guide Using CBTHe is also editor of a best-selling text in the APA School Psychology Book Series,  Autism Spectrum Disorder in Children and Adolescents: Evidence-Based Assessment and Intervention in Schools. His latest book is A Best Practice Guide to Assessment and Intervention for Autism Spectrum Disorder in Schools (2nd Edition).

    Saturday, November 19, 2016

    Award-Winning Finalist in the Psychology/Mental Health category of the 2016 Best Book Awards



    Overcoming Anxiety and Depression on the Autism Spectrum is available from Jessica Kingsley Publishers, AmazonBarnes & Noble, Book DepositoryBooks-A-Million and other online book retailers.

    Get the lowest price on Overcoming Anxiety and Depression on the Autism Spectrum: A Self-help Guide Using CBT from AllBookstores.com.

    Lee A. Wilkinson, PhD is a licensed and nationally certified school psychologist, registered psychologist, and certified cognitive-behavioral therapist. He provides consultation services and best practice guidance to school systems, agencies, advocacy groups, and professionals on a wide variety of topics related to children and youth with autism spectrum disorder. Dr. Wilkinson is author of the award-winning books,  A Best Practice Guide to Assessment and Intervention for Autism and Asperger Syndrome in Schools and Overcoming Anxiety and Depression on the Autism Spectrum: A Self-Help Guide Using CBTHe is also editor of a best-selling text in the APA School Psychology Book Series, Autism Spectrum Disorder in Children and Adolescents: Evidence-Based Assessment and Intervention in Schools. His latest book is A Best Practice Guide to Assessment and Intervention for Autism Spectrum Disorder in Schools (2nd Edition).



    Wednesday, November 16, 2016

    Best Practice Review: The Social Communication Questionnaire (SCQ)

    Best Practice Review: The Social Communication Questionnaire (SCQ)

    The Social Communication Questionnaire (SCQ; Rutter, Bailey, & Lord, 2003), previously known as the Autism Screening Questionnaire (ASQ), was initially designed as a companion screening measure for the Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised (ADI-R; Rutter, Le Couteur & Lord). The SCQ is a parent/caregiver dimensional measure of ASD symptomatology appropriate for children of any chronological age older than fours years. It can be completed by the informant in less than 10 minutes. The primary standardization data were obtained from a sample of 200 individuals who had participated in previous studies of ASD. 

    The SCQ is available in two forms, Lifetime and Current, each with 40 questions presented in a yes or no format. Scores on the questionnaire provide an index of symptom severity and indicate the likelihood that a child has an ASD. Questions include items in the reciprocal social interaction domain (e.g., “Does she/he have any particular friends or best friend?”), the communication domain (e.g., “Can you have a to and fro ‘conversation’ with him/her that involves taking turns or building on what you have said?”) and the restricted, repetitive, and stereotyped patterns of behavior domain (e.g., Has she/he ever seemed to be more interested in parts of a toy or an object [e.g., spinning the wheels of a car], rather than using the object as intended?”).
    Compared to other screening measures, the SCQ has received significant scrutiny and has consistently demonstrated its effectiveness in predicting ASD versus non-ASD status in multiple studies. A meta-analysis examining the previous research on the utility of the SCQ as a screening instrument found it to be an acceptable screening tool for ASD (area under the curve = 0.885) (Chesnut et al., 2017). The scale has been found to have good discriminant validity and utility as an efficient screener for at-risk groups of school-age children. The lifetime version is recommended for screening purposes as it demonstrates the highest sensitivity value. A threshold raw score of >15 is recommended to minimize the risk of false negatives and indicate the need for a comprehensive evaluation. Comparing autism to other diagnoses, this threshold score resulted in a sensitivity value of .96 and a specificity value of .80 in a large population of children with autism and other developmental disorders. The positive predictive value was .93 with this cutoff. The authors recommend using different cut-off scores for different purposes and populations. Several studies (Allen et al., 2007; Eaves et al, 2006) have suggested that a cut-off of 11 may be more clinically useful (Norris & Lecavalier, 2010).
    The SCQ is one of the most researched of the ASD-specific evaluation tools and can be recommended for screening and as part of comprehensive developmental assessment for ASD (Chestnut et al., 2017; Norris & Lecavalier, 2010; Wilkinson, 2010, 2016). The SCQ (Lifetime form) is an efficient screening instrument for identifying children with possible ASD for a more in-depth assessment. For clinical purposes, practitioners might consider a multistage assessment beginning with the SCQ, followed by a comprehensive developmental evaluation (Wilkinson, 2011, 2016). However, cut-off scores may need to be adjusted depending on the population in which it is used. The evidence also indicates that although the SCQ is appropriate for a wide age range, it is less effective when used with younger populations (e.g., children two to three years). It was designed for individuals above the age of four years, and seems to perform best with individuals over seven years of age.

    References

    Allen CW, Silove N, Williams K, et al. (2007). Validity of the Social Communication Questionnaire in Assessing Risk of Autism in Preschool Children with Developmental Problems. J Autism Dev Disord37, 1272–8.

    Chandler, S., Charman, T., Baird, G., Simonoff, E., Loucas, T., Meldrum, D., & Pickles, A. (2007). Validation of the Social Communication Questionnaire in a population cohort of children with autism spectrum disorders. Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 46, 1324–1332.

    Chesnut, S. R., Wei,T., Barnard-Brak, L., & Richman, D. M. (2017). A meta-analysis of the social communication questionnaire: Screening for autism spectrum disorder. Autism, 21, 920-928. https://doi.org/10.1177/1362361316660065
    Eaves L, Wingert H, Ho H, et al. (2006). Screening for Autism Spectrum Disorders with the Social Communication Questionnaire. Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics, 27, 95–103.
    Mash, E. J., & Hunsley, J. (2005). Evidence-based assessment of child and adolescent disorders: Issues and challenges. Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology, 34, 362-379.
    Norris, M., & Lecavalier, L. (2010). Screening accuracy of level 2 autism spectrum disorder rating scales: A review of selected instruments. Autism, 14, 263–284.
    Rutter, M., Bailey, A., & Lord, C. (2003). Social Communication Questionnaire. Los Angeles: Western Psychological Services.
    Wilkinson, L. A. (2010).  A best practice guide to assessment and intervention for autism and Asperger syndrome in schools. London and Philadelphia: Jessica Kingsley Publishers.
    Wilkinson, L. A. (2011). Identifying students with autism spectrum disorders: A review of selected screening tools. Communiqué, 40, pp. 1, 31-33.

    Wilkinson, L. A. (2017).  A best practice guide to assessment and intervention for autism spectrum disorder in schools (2nd Edition). London and Philadelphia: Jessica Kingsley Publishers.

    Lee A. Wilkinson, PhD, NCSP is a licensed and nationally certified school psychologist, registered psychologist, and certified cognitive-behavioral therapist. He is author of the award-winning book, A Best Practice Guide to Assessment and Intervention for Autism and Asperger Syndrome in Schools, published by Jessica Kingsley Publishers. He is also editor of a best-selling text in the APA School Psychology Book Series, Autism Spectrum Disorder in Children and Adolescents: Evidence-Based Assessment and Intervention in Schools, and author of the book, Overcoming Anxiety and Depression on the Autism Spectrum: A Self-Help Guide Using CBT. Dr. Wilkinson's latest book is A Best Practice Guide to Assessment and Intervention for Autism Spectrum Disorder in Schools (2nd Edition).

    © Lee A. Wilkinson, PhD

    Monday, November 7, 2016

    Healthcare Providers Unprepared to Treat Adults with Autism


    Healthcare Providers Unprepared to Treat Autistic Adults

    It is estimated that nearly a half million youth with autism will enter adulthood over the next decade. As children with autism become adults their primary medical care will move from pediatrics to adult medicine. A survey by the Autism Research Program at Kaiser Permanente Northern California found that many healthcare providers are ill prepared to treat adults on the autism spectrum. The findings were reported at the International Meeting for Autism Research in Salt Lake CityUtah.
    Researchers polled providers of adult primary care, mental health, and obstetrics and gynecology services through the insurer’s network. Practitioners were asked about their ability to recognize autism, their knowledge of the disorder, their comfort level in treating those with the condition and their need for training and resources.
    Of 922 providers surveyed, 77 percent rated their ability to treat patients on the spectrum as poor or fair. While more that 90 percent of the providers said they would investigate the possibility of autism in patients with limited eye contact, most under-reported the number of people on the autism spectrum who were actually under their care. In addition, only 13 percent of providers indicated that they had adequate tools or referral resources to appropriately accommodate those with autism.
    To better understand the providers’ responses, follow-up interviews were conducted with nine primary care physicians. The researchers found that the majority had received limited or no autism training in medical school or during their residencies. All of the providers indicated a need for more education and improvements in the transition from pediatric care providers to adult medicine for those on the autism spectrum.
    The preparation of healthcare providers is a pressing issue as an increasing number of individuals with autism are expected to enter adulthood in the coming years. Further research is urgently needed to study the transition from pediatric to adult healthcare and identify strategies that will lead to better medical care for adults on the autism spectrum.

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