Thursday, December 21, 2017

A Multi-Tiered Approach to Screening for Autism

A Multi-Tiered Approach to Screening for Autism

There has been a dramatic worldwide increase in reported cases of autism over the past decade. Yet, compared to population estimates, many students remain underidentified and underserved in our schools. It is not unusual for children with less severe symptoms of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) to go unidentified until well after entering school. As a result, it is critical that school-based educational support personnel (e.g., school psychologists, speech/language pathologists, special educators, counselors, and social workers) give greater priority to case finding and screening to ensure that children with ASD are identified and have access to the appropriate programs and services. 
   Screening and Identification

Until recently, there were few validated screening measures available to assist school professionals in the identification of students with the core ASD-related behaviors. However, our knowledge base is expanding rapidly and we now have reliable and valid tools to screen and evaluate children more efficiently and with greater accuracy. The following tools have demonstrated utility in screening for ASD in educational settings and can be used to determine which children are likely to require further assessment and/or who might benefit from additional support. All measures have sound psychometric properties, are appropriate for school-age children, and time efficient (10 to 20 minutes to complete). Training needs are minimal and require little or no professional instruction to complete. However, interpretation of results requires familiarity with ASD and experience in administering, scoring, and interpreting psychological tests.
The Autism Spectrum Rating Scales (ASRS; Goldstein & Naglieri, 2009) is a norm-referenced tool designed to effectively identify symptoms, behaviors, and associated features of ASD in children and adolescents from 2 to 18 years of age. The ASRS can be completed by teachers and/or parents and has both long and short forms. The Short form was developed for screening purposes and contains 15 items from the full-length form that have been shown to differentiate children diagnosed with ASD from children in the general population. High scores indicate that many behaviors associated with ASD have been observed and follow-up recommended.
The Social Communication Questionnaire (SCQ; Rutter, Bailey, & Lord, 2003), previously known as the Autism Screening Questionnaire (ASQ), is a parent/caregiver dimensional measure of ASD symptomatology appropriate for children of any chronological age older than four years. It is available in two forms, Lifetime and Current, each with 40 questions. Scores on the questionnaire provide a reasonable index of symptom severity in the reciprocal social interaction, communication, and restricted/repetitive behavior domains and indicate the likelihood that a child has an ASD. The lifetime version is recommended for screening purposes as it demonstrates the highest sensitivity value. 
The Social Responsiveness Scale, Second Edition (SRS-2; Constantino & Gruber, 2012) is a brief quantitative measure of autistic behaviors in 4 to 18 year old children and youth. This 65-item rating scale was designed to be completed by an adult (teacher and/or parent) who is familiar with the child’s current behavior and developmental history. The SRS items measure the ASD symptoms in the domains of social awareness, social information processing, reciprocal social communication, social anxiety/avoidance, and stereotypic behavior/restricted interests. The scale provides a Total Score that reflects the level of severity across the entire autism spectrum.
A Multi-Tiered Screening Strategy
The ASRS, SCQ, and SRS-2 can be used confidently as efficient first-level screening tools for identifying the presence of the more broadly defined and subtle symptoms of higher-functioning ASD in school settings. School-based professionals should consider the following multi-step strategy for identifying at-risk students who are in need of an in-depth assessment.
Tier  one. The initial step is case finding. This involves the ability to recognize the risk factors and/or warning signs of ASD. All school professionals should be engaged in case finding and be alert to those students who display atypical social and/or communication behaviors that might be associated with ASD. Parent and/or teacher reports of social impairment combined with communication and behavioral concerns constitute a “red flag” and indicate the need for screening. Students who are identified with risk factors during the case finding phase should be referred for formal screening.
Tier two. Scores on the ASRS, SCQ, and SRS-2 may be used as an indication of the approximate severity of ASD symptomatology for students who present with elevated developmental risk factors and/or warning signs of ASD. Screening results are shared with parents and school-based teams with a focus on intervention planning and ongoing observation. Scores can also be used for progress monitoring and to measure change over time. Students with a positive screen who continue to show minimal progress at this level are then considered for a more comprehensive assessment and intensive interventions as part of Tier 3.  However, as with all screening tools, there will be some false negatives (children with ASD who are not identified). Thus, children who screen negative, but who have a high level of risk and/or where parent and/or teacher concerns indicate developmental variations and behaviors consistent with an autism-related disorder should continue to be monitored, regardless of screening results.
Tier three. Students who meet the threshold criteria in step two may then referred for an in-depth assessment. Because the ASRS, SCQ, and SRS-2 are strongly related to well-established and researched gold standard measures and report high levels of sensitivity (ability to correctly identify cases in a population), the results from these screening measures can be used in combination with a comprehensive developmental assessment of social behavior, language and communication, adaptive behavior, motor skills, sensory issues, and cognitive functioning to aid in determining eligibility for special education services and as a guide to intervention planning.
Limitations

Although the ASRS, SCQ, and SRS can be used confidently as efficient screening tools for identifying children across the broad autism spectrum, they are not without limitations. Some students who screen positive will not be identified with an ASD (false positive). On the other hand, some children who were not initially identified will go on to meet the diagnostic and/or classification criteria (false negative). Therefore, it is especially important to carefully monitor those students who screen negative to ensure access to intervention services if needed. Gathering information from family and school resources during screening will also facilitate identification of possible cases. Autism specific tools are not currently recommended for the universal screening of typical school-age children. Focusing on referred children with identified risk-factors and/or developmental delays will increase predictive values and result in more efficient identification efforts.

Concluding Comments
Compared with general population estimates, children with mild autistic traits appear to be an underidentified and underserved population in our schools. There are likely a substantial number of children with equivalent profiles to those with a clinical diagnosis of ASD who are not receiving services. Research indicates that outcomes for children on the autism spectrum can be significantly enhanced with the delivery of intensive intervention services. However, intervention services can only be implemented if students are identified. Screening is the initial step in this process. School professionals should be prepared to recognize the presence of risk factors and/or early warning signs of ASD, engage in case finding, and be familiar with screening tools in order to ensure children with ASD are being identified and provided with the appropriate programs and services. 

Best practice screening and assessment guidelines are available from: A Best Practice Guide to Assessment and Intervention for Autism Spectrum Disorder in Schools (2nd Edition). 

Lee A. Wilkinson, PhD, NCSP is a licensed and nationally certified school psychologist, registered psychologist, and certified cognitive-behavioral therapist. He provides consultation services and best practice guidance to school systems, agencies, advocacy groups, and professionals on a wide variety of topics related to children and youth with autism spectrum disorders. Dr. Wilkinson is author of the award-winning books,  A Best Practice Guide to Assessment and Intervention for Autism and Asperger Syndrome in Schools and Overcoming Anxiety and Depression on the Autism Spectrum: A Self-Help Guide Using CBTHe is also editor of a best-selling text in the APA School Psychology Book Series,  Autism Spectrum Disorder in Children and Adolescents: Evidence-Based Assessment and Intervention in Schools. His latest book is A Best Practice Guide to Assessment and Intervention for Autism Spectrum Disorder in Schools (2nd Edition).

Wednesday, December 20, 2017

Autism: Parent Acceptance and Empowerment

Patent Acceptance and Empowerment

Parents are often overwhelmed by the challenges presented by a child with autism. Research has shown that parents of children on the spectrum exhibit a characteristic stress profile which includes anxiety related to the child's uneven intellectual profiles, deficits in social relatedness, disruptive and maladaptive behaviors (internalizing and externalizing problems) and long-term care concerns. Among these stressors, the child’s maladaptive behavior profile is most reliably linked to parent stress. 

Studies indicate that raising children with autism is associated with higher levels of parenting stress and psychological distress than parenting typically developing children, children with a physical disability, or children with developmental delays without autism. Mothers, in particular, appear to face unique challenges related to the characteristics of autism. Because autism impairs social relatedness and adaptive functioning, parent stress can decrease helpful psychological processes and directly influence the parent or caregiver’s ability to support the child with disabilities.
Increased attention is now being given to the psychological well-being of parents of children and youth with autism. A number of studies have examined the factors that can influence the impact of children’s problem behavior on parent mental health. A study in the Journal Autism examined the relationships between child problem behavior, parent mental health problems, psychological acceptance (e.g., accepting and not being adversely influenced by negative emotions and thoughts that a parent may have about their child), and parent empowerment (e.g., actively attempting to change or eliminate potentially stressful events through the application of knowledge and skills).
The researchers found that the more positive parents’ psychological acceptance and empowerment, the less they reported severe mental health problems. Although greater parent empowerment was associated with fewer parent mental health problems, psychological acceptance had the greatest impact on parent mental health problems, after controlling for ASD symptomatology, negative life events, parent and child gender, and child age. 
This study has several important implications. The relatively chronic nature of behavior problems in children with autism may explain why acceptance is a more significant psychological construct for explaining parent mental health than is empowerment. If difficulties are manageable and support readily available, then an active, problem-focused coping style would be related to improved parent adjustment. However, for children with autism who exhibit more persistent behavior problems, or for highly stressed and frustrated parents, a problem-focused process may not be enough to ensure positive parent adjustment. If problems are less controllable and/or support less accessible, it may be impossible for parents to focus exclusively on trying to change or avoid their current experience. The authors comment, “In these situations, parents need a different coping strategy, one that allows them to acknowledge their current experience without trying to change it or avoid it.”  Therefore, it may be critically important to understand and evaluate the situation of the family, and offer parents both types of coping skills (acceptance and empowerment) for use across different situations.
Importantly, this study supports the exploration of acceptance and mindfulness-based interventions as effective approaches for parents of children with autism and underscores the importance of considering the parent psychological experience when developing treatments for child problem behavior. The authors conclude, “Child-focused therapy should not focus exclusively on the child. At the same time that we provide parents with skills and supports to improve their children’s experience, we must also invest in helping parents to deal with their own emotions and coping strategies. 
Weiss, J. A., Cappadocia, M. C., MacMullin, J. A., Viecili, M., & Lunsky, Y. (2012). The impact of child problem behaviors of children with ASD on parent mental health: The mediating role of acceptance and empowerment. Autism, 16, 261-274. DOI: 10.1177/1362361311422708
Lee A. Wilkinson, PhD, NCSP is a licensed and nationally certified school psychologist, registered psychologist, and certified cognitive-behavioral therapist. He provides consultation services and best practice guidance to school systems, agencies, advocacy groups, and professionals on a wide variety of topics related to children and youth with autism spectrum disorders. Dr. Wilkinson is author of the award-winning books,  A Best Practice Guide to Assessment and Intervention for Autism and Asperger Syndrome in Schools and Overcoming Anxiety and Depression on the Autism Spectrum: A Self-Help Guide Using CBTHe is also editor of a best-selling text in the APA School Psychology Book Series,  Autism Spectrum Disorder in Children and Adolescents: Evidence-Based Assessment and Intervention in Schools. His latest book is A Best Practice Guide to Assessment and Intervention for Autism Spectrum Disorder in Schools (2nd Edition).

Friday, December 1, 2017

Holiday Tips for Parents of Kids on the Autism Spectrum


The holiday season can be a stressful time of year for everyone, especially for parents of children on the autism spectrum. The sights and sounds of the holidays can be stressful and over-stimulating. There are many changes in routine, family events, parties, and vacations that need to be planned. Sometimes the stress of these changes can become overwhelming and the joy and happiness of the holidays might be lost. Here are some helpful tips to lessen your child’s anxiety and increase your family’s enjoyment of the holiday season: 

 Decorating and Shopping  
  • If your child has difficulty with change, you may want to gradually decorate the house. Decorate in stages, rather than all at once. It may also be helpful to develop a visual  schedule or calendar that shows what will be done on each day.
  • Allow your child to interact with the decorations and help put them in place.
  • Flashing lights or musical decorations can disturb some children. To see how your child will respond, provide an opportunity experience these items in a store or at elsewhere first. 
  • Last minute holiday shopping can be stressful for children who rely on routines. If you do take your child shopping, allow enough time to gradually adapt to the intense holiday stimuli that stores exhibit this time of year.
 Family Routines and Travel
  • Meet as a family to discuss how to minimize disruptions to established routines and how to  support positive behavior when disruptions are inevitable. 
  • Continue using behavior support strategies during the holidays. For example, use social stories to help your child cope with changes in routine and visual supports to help prepare for more complicated days.
  •  Use a visual schedule if you are celebrating the holidays on more than one day to show when there will be parties/gifts and when there will not. 
  • Use rehearsal and role play to give children practice ahead of time in dealing with new social situations, or work together to prepare a social story that incorporates all the elements of an upcoming event or visit to better prepare them for that situation 
  • If you are traveling for the holidays, make sure you have child’s favorite foods, books or toys available. Having familiar items readily available can help to calm stressful situations. 
  • If you are going to visit family or friends, make sure there is a quiet, calm place to go to if needed. Teach your child to leave a situation and/or how to access support when a situation becomes overwhelming. For example, if you are having visitors, have a space set aside for the child as his/her safe/calm space. He or she should be taught ahead of time that they should go to their space when feeling overwhelmed. This self- management strategy will also be helpful in future situations.
 Gifts and Play Time
  • If you put gifts under the Christmas tree, prepare well ahead of time by teaching that gifts are not to be opened without the family there. Give your child a wrapped and a reward for keeping it intact. 
  • Practice unwrapping gifts, taking turns and waiting for others, and giving gifts. Role play scenarios with your child in preparation for him/her getting a gift they may not want 
  • Take toys and other gifts out of the box before wrapping them. It can be more fun and less frustrating if your child can open the gift and play with it immediately. 
  • When opening gifts as a family, try passing around an ornament to signal whose turn it is to open the next gift. This helps alleviate disorganization and the frustration of waiting. 
  • Prepare siblings and young relatives to share their new gifts with others. 
  • If necessary, consider giving your child a quiet space to play with his/her own gifts, away from the temptation of grabbing at other children’s toys 
  • Prepare family members for strategies to use to minimize anxiety or behavioral incidents, and to enhance participation. Provide suggestions ahead of time that will make for a less stressful holiday season. 
  • Keep an eye out for signs of anxiety or distress, including an increase in behavior such as humming or rocking - this may indicate it's time to take a break from the activity.
  •  Understand how much noise and other sensory input your child can manage. Know their level of anxiety and the amount of preparation it may require. 
  • Try to relax and have a good time. Do everything possible to help reduce the stress level for your child and family during the holidays. If you are tense your child may sense that something is wrong. Don’t forget to prepare yourself! A calm and collected parent is better able to help their family enjoy this wonderful time of year.

Lee A. Wilkinson, PhD,  NCSP is a licensed and nationally certified school psychologist, registered psychologist, and certified cognitive-behavioral therapist. He provides consultation services and best practice guidance to school systems, agencies, advocacy groups, and professionals on a wide variety of topics related to children and youth with autism spectrum disorders. Dr. Wilkinson is author of the award-winning books,  A Best Practice Guide to Assessment and Intervention for Autism and Asperger Syndrome in Schools and Overcoming Anxiety and Depression on the Autism Spectrum: A Self-Help Guide Using CBTHe is also editor of a best-selling text in the APA School Psychology Book Series,  Autism Spectrum Disorder in Children and Adolescents: Evidence-Based Assessment and Intervention in Schools. His latest book is A Best Practice Guide to Assessment and Intervention for Autism Spectrum Disorder in Schools (2nd Edition).

Friday, November 17, 2017

Best Book Awards - A Best Practice Guide to Assessment & Intervention for Autism Spectrum Disorder in Schools


A Best Practice Guide to Assessment & Intervention for Autism Spectrum Disorder in Schools (2nd Edition) has been selected as an Award-Winning Finalist in the "Education/Academic" category of the 2017 Best Book AwardsFully updated to reflect current assessment tools, procedures and research, this award-winning book provides a practical and scientifically-based approach to identifying, assessing, and treating children and adolescents with an Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) in school settings. Integrating current research evidence with theory and best practice, each chapter features a consolidated and integrative description of best practice assessment and intervention approaches for children and youth with ASD. It brings the topics of assessment and intervention together in a single authoritative resource guide consistent with recent advances in evidence-based practice.  Illustrative case examples, glossary of terms, and helpful checklists and forms make this the definitive resource for identifying and implementing interventions for school-age children and youth with ASD.

This Guide is intended to meet the needs of school-based professionals such as school psychologists, counselors, speech/language pathologists, occupational therapists, counselors, social workers, administrators, and both general and special education teachers. Parents, advocates, and community-based professionals will also find this guide a valuable and informative resource.

                                          
Editorial Reviews  

“It is rare that one book can pack so many resources and easy to digest information into a single volume!  Families, school personnel, and professionals all need the extensive, and up-to-date tips, guides, and ‘must-knows’ provided here. It’s obvious the author is both a seasoned researcher and practitioner – a winning combination.” — Dr. Debra Moore, psychologist and co-author with Dr. Temple Grandin, of The Loving Push: How Parents & Professionals Can Help Spectrum Kids Become Successful Adult 

“Dr Wilkinson has done it again. This updated and scholarly Second Edition reflects important recent changes regarding diagnosis and services for students with Autism Spectrum Disorder. With its numerous best-practice suggestions, it is a must-read for school psychologists, school social workers, and those who teach in general and special education.” — Dr Steven Landau, Professor of School Psychology in the Department of Psychology, Illinois State University 

“This book is an essential resource for every educator that works with students with ASD! The easy-to-read format is complete with up to date research on evidence-based practices for this population, sample observation and assessment worksheets and case studies that allow the reader to apply the information presented.” — Gena P. Barnhill, PhD, NCSP, BCBA-D, LBA, Director of Special Education Programs at Lynchburg College, Lynchburg, VA  

Availability

A Best practice Guide to Assessment and Intervention for Autism Spectrum Disorder in Schools (2nd Edition) is available from Jessica Kingsley PublishersAmazon.comBarnes & NobleBooks-A-MillionBook DepositoryTarget.com,Walmart.comand other booksellers. The book is available in both print and eBook formats.
Author
Lee A. Wilkinson, PhD, NCSP is a licensed and nationally certified school psychologist, registered psychologist, and certified cognitive-behavioral therapist. He provides consultation services and best practice guidance to school systems, agencies, advocacy groups, and professionals on a wide variety of topics related to children and youth with autism spectrum disorder. He is also a university educator and school psychology trainer. His research and professional writing has focused primarily on behavioral consultation and therapy, and evidence-based practice in assessment and intervention for autism spectrum disorder. He has published numerous journal articles on these subjects both in the US and internationally. Dr. Wilkinson is author of the award-winning book,  A Best Practice Guide to Assessment and Intervention for Autism and Asperger Syndrome in Schools and editor of a best-selling text in the APA School Psychology Book Series,  Autism Spectrum Disorder in Children and Adolescents: Evidence-Based Assessment and Intervention in SchoolsHis previous book, Overcoming Anxiety and Depression on the Autism Spectrum: A Self-Help Guide Using CBT, was honored as an “Award-Winning Finalist in the “Psychology/Mental Health” category of the 2016 Best Book Awards.”

Monday, November 6, 2017

Transition Planning for Students with Autism

Transition Planning for Students on the Autism Spectrum
Once the young person with autism leaves the school system, the educational entitlements of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act of 2004 (IDEA 2004) are no longer available. The need for supports and services to help adolescents transition to greater independence has become a critical issue as a growing number of youth face significant challenges, with many on the spectrum unemployed, isolated, and lacking services (Orsmond, Shattuck, Cooper, Sterzing, & Anderson, 2013). Research indicates that outcomes are almost universally lower for youth on the autism spectrum compared to their peers. According to the National Autism Indicators Report: Transition into Young Adulthood (Roux, Shattuck, Rast, Rava, & Anderson, 2015): (a) only about one in five lived independently (without parental supervision) in the period between high school and their early 20s; (b) approximately 26 percent of young adults and 28 percent of those unemployed and not in school received no services which could help them with employment, continue their education, or live more independently; (c) Over one-third (37 percent) of young adults were disconnected during their early 20s, meaning they never got a job or continued education after high school; and (d) transition planning, a key process for helping youth build skills and access services as they enter adulthood, was frequently delayed. Just 58 percent of youth had a transition plan by the federally required age.
The Transition Plan
The transition from school to adulthood is a process that begins when students and their parents begin planning for their post high school life. A transition plan is critical for young people with autism to be successful and participate to the fullest extent possible in society. The focus of intervention planning must shift from addressing the core deficits in childhood to promoting adaptive behaviors that can facilitate and enhance functional independence and quality of life in adulthood. This includes new developmental challenges such as independent living, self-advocacy, vocational engagement, postsecondary education, and family support.
IDEA requires that transition plan activities for students with disabilities begin no later than the first IEP to be in effect when the child turns 16, or younger if determined appropriate by the IEP team or state education agency. Transition services are a coordinated set of activities that focus on improving the academic and functional achievement of the student with a disability to facilitate the movement from school to post-school activities, including postsecondary education, vocational education, integrated employment (as well as supported employment); continuing and adult education, adult services, independent living, or community participation. Responsibilities of the IEP team include coordinating communication and services between school and community-based service providers; addressing environmental, sensory, behavioral and/or mental health concerns; identifying potential careers and employers; and teaching work behaviors, job skills, and community living skills (Virginia Department of Education, 2010). Just as with other educational services in a student’s IEP, schools must provide the services necessary for the student to achieve the transition goals stated in the IEP. The IEP must include: (a) appropriate measurable postsecondary goals based upon age-appropriate transition assessments related to training, education, employment and, where appropriate, independent living skills; (b) the transition services (including courses of study) needed to assist the child in reaching those goals; and (c) beginning not later than one year before the child reaches the age of majority under state law, a statement that the child has been informed of the child’s rights under Part B, if any, that will transfer to the child on reaching the age of majority. The school must also invite the student to his or her IEP meeting if a purpose of the meeting will be the consideration of the postsecondary goals for the child and the transition services needed to assist the child in reaching these goals (IDEA, 2004).
Conclusion
Students with autism face significant challenges as they transition to adulthood. Postsecondary outcome studies reveal poor long-term outcomes in living arrangements, employment, and community integration when compared to their peers with other types of disabilities. Research indicates that many are socially isolated and that the vast majority of young adults with ASD will be residing in the parental or guardian home during the period of emerging adulthood (Anderson, Shattuck, Cooper, Roux, & Wagner, 2014; Orsmond, Shattuck, Cooper, Sterzing, & Anderson, 2013). A consistent theme for parents of adolescents with autism is the fear that their child will “fall through the cracks” when transitioning from child to adult services. Unfortunately, access to needed supports and services drops off dramatically after high school - with many receiving little or no assistance.
As we know, no two people on the autism spectrum are alike. The characteristics, strengths and challenges, and severity of impairments vary widely across individuals. Support and service needs also differ and continually change as individuals with autism age. Comprehensive transition planning and support for students leaving high school and exiting special educational programming, each with unique strengths, interests, and challenges, is an urgent task confronting our communities and schools (Roux, Shattuck, Rast, Rava, & Anderson, 2015). Greater emphasis must be placed on transition planning as a key process for helping youth build skills and access services as they leave school and enter adulthood. This includes a focus on independent living skills, self-advocacy, vocational engagement, postsecondary education, family support, and a continuum of mental health services for those experiencing comorbid (co-occurring) mental health problems (Lake, Perry, & Lunsky, 2014). 

Image courtesy of http://advocacyinaction.net/autism-preparing-your-child-for/
Adapted from Wilkinson, L. A. (2016). A best practice guide to assessment and intervention for autism spectrum disorder in schools. London and Philadelphia: Jessica Kingsley Publishers.
Anderson, K. A., Shattuck, P. T., Cooper, B. P., Roux, A. M., & Wagner, M. (2014). Prevalence and correlates of postsecondary residential status among young adults with an autism spectrum disorder. Autism, 18, 562-570.  doi: 10.1177/1362361313481860
Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act of 2004. Pub. L. No. 108-446, 108th Congress, 2nd Session. (2004).
Lake, J. K., Perry, A., & Lunsky, Y. (2014). Mental health services for individuals with high functioning autism spectrum disorder. Autism Research and Treatment, Volume 2014, Article ID 502420. doi:10.1155/2014/502420
Orsmond, G. I., Shattuck, P. T., Cooper, B. P., Sterzing, P. R., & Anderson, K. A. (2013). Social participation among young adults with an autism spectrum disorder. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 43, 270-2719. doi 10.1007/s10803-013-1833-8
Roux, A. M., Shattuck, P. T., Rast, J. E., Rava, J. A., & Anderson, K. A. (2015). National Autism Indicators Report: Transition into Young Adulthood. Philadelphia, PA: Life Course Outcomes Research Program, A.J. Drexel Autism Institute, Drexel University. Available from http://drexe.lu/autismindicators
Ohio Center for Autism and Low Incidence (OCALI). Transition to Adulthood Guidelines.
http://www.ocali.org/project/transition_to_adulthood_guidelines
Virginia Department of Education, Office of Special Education and Student Services (October, 2010). Autism Spectrum Disorders and the Transition to Adulthood.
Wagner, S. (2014). Continuum of services and individualized education plan process. In L. A. Wilkinson (Ed.). Autism spectrum disorder in children and adolescents:  Evidence-based assessment and intervention in schools (pp. 173-193). Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.
Wilkinson, L. A. (2016). A best practice guide to assessment and intervention for autism spectrum disorder in schools. Philadelphia & London: Jessica Kingsley Publishers.
Wrightslaw. Transition Planning. http://www.wrightslaw.com/info/trans.index.htm
Lee A. Wilkinson, PhD, NCSP is a licensed and nationally certified school psychologist, registered psychologist, and certified cognitive-behavioral therapist. He provides consultation services and best practice guidance to school systems, agencies, advocacy groups, and professionals on a wide variety of topics related to children and youth with autism spectrum disorders. Dr. Wilkinson is author of the award-winning books, A Best Practice Guide to Assessment and Intervention for Autism and Asperger Syndrome in Schools and Overcoming Anxiety and Depression on the Autism Spectrum: A Self-Help Guide Using CBTHe is also editor of a best-selling text in the APA School Psychology Book Series, Autism Spectrum Disorder in Children and Adolescents: Evidence-Based Assessment and Intervention in Schools. His latest book is A Best Practice Guide to Assessment and Intervention for Autism Spectrum Disorder in Schools (2nd Edition).

Wednesday, November 1, 2017

Sensory Sensitivity in Adults on the Autism Spectrum

Sensory Sensitivity in Autistic Adults

Anecdotal reports and empirical evidence suggest that atypical or unusual sensory responses are a common feature of autism spectrum conditions. Sensory issues are now included in the DSM-5 symptom criteria for restricted, repetitive patterns of behavior, interests, or activities (RRB). This includes hyper-or hypo-reactivity to sensory input or unusual interest in sensory aspects of the environment; such as apparent indifference to pain/heat/cold and adverse response to specific sounds or textures.  For example, one of the most commonly reported challenges for individuals with autism spectrum conditions is hypersensitivity to noise. Many adults report sound sensitivity problems such as hyperacusis, Misophonia, and phobias related to specific sounds. When present, sensory problems can interfere with adaptability in many areas of life (communication, daily living, socialization, occupational). Understanding sensory issues in adults on the autism spectrum is critical to the identification and prescription of appropriate interventions especially considering studies that suggest a link between anxiety and sensory over-responsivity which can further compromise an individual's ability to function successfully in daily life.

A study published in Autism investigated sensory over-responsivity in adults compared to control participants and the extent to which daily life experiences were endorsed as uncomfortable or distressing by those on the spectrum. The researcher’s hypothesized that adults with autism would report more sensory over-responsivity than controls. A second objective was to test whether sensory over-responsivity is linked to autistic traits in adults with and without autism.
Adults with (n = 221) and without (n = 181) autism spectrum conditions participated in an online survey. The Autism Spectrum Quotient (AQ), the Raven Progressive Matrices and the Sensory Processing Scale were used to characterize the sample. Adults with autism spectrum conditions reported more sensory over-responsivity than control participants across all sensory modalities (vision, hearing, touch, smell, taste and proprioceptive). These findings highlight the importance of measuring each sensory domain separately rather than combining scores from various sensory domains. Notable in this study was the association between sensory over-responsivity and autistic traits. Increased sensory sensitivity was associated with more self-reported autistic traits, both across and within groups. These results indicate that adults on the autism spectrum experience sensory over-responsivity to daily sensory stimuli to a high degree and that a positive relationship exists between sensory over-responsivity and autistic traits.
Despite its limitations, this study shows that adults on the spectrum self-report over-responsivity across multiple sensory domains (vision, hearing, touch, smell, taste and proprioceptive) that affect their daily life routines and thus quality of life. Although sensory symptoms improve with maturation for typical individuals, sensory features in ASD remain stable and may become more challenging during adulthood. Likewise, sensory over-responsivity has also been linked to higher rates of depression and anxiety. Evaluating and attending to over-responsivity have implications for understanding and addressing the sensory components of their daily life routines and roles. Appropriate intervention should be directed towards sensory issues that may be contributing to emotional and psychological challenges and towards designing sensory friendly domestic and work environments.
Tavassoli T., Miller, L. J., Schoen, S. A., Nielsen, D. M., & Baron-Cohen, S. (2014). Sensory over-responsivity in adults with autism spectrum conditions. Autism, 18, 428–432.  
doi: 10.1177/1362361313477246

Lee A. Wilkinson, PhD, NCSP is a licensed and nationally certified school psychologist, registered psychologist, and certified cognitive-behavioral therapist. He is author of the award-winning book, A Best Practice Guide to Assessment and Intervention for Autism and Asperger Syndrome in Schools, published by Jessica Kingsley Publishers. He is also the editor of a best-selling text in the APA School Psychology Book Series, Autism Spectrum Disorder in Children and Adolescents: Evidence-Based Assessment and Intervention in Schools and author of the book, Overcoming Anxiety and Depression on the Autism Spectrum: A Self-Help Guide Using CBTHis latest book is A Best Practice Guide to Assessment and Intervention for Autism Spectrum Disorder in Schools (2nd edition).

Tuesday, October 17, 2017

Restricted & Repetitive Behavior (RRB) in Autism: Assessment & Future Directions

Restricted and Repetitive Behavior (RRB) in Autism

The DSM-5 criteria for autism spectrum disorder (ASD) include restricted and repetitive behavior (RRB) as a core diagnostic feature, together with the domain of social communication and social interaction deficits. RRBs include: (a) stereotyped or repetitive speech, motor movements, or use of objects; (b) excessive adherence to routines, ritualized patterns of verbal or nonverbal behavior, or excessive resistance to change; (c) highly restricted, fixated interests that are abnormal in intensity or focus; and (d) hyper- or hyporeactivity to sensory input or unusual interest in sensory aspects of the environment (American Psychiatric Association, 2013). Studies of RRBs have identified two sub-groups; one comprising repetitive sensory and motor behaviors (RSMB), such as repetitive hand or finger movements and rocking, and the other consisting of behaviors such as narrow interests, rigid routines, and rituals routines, which are collectively referred to as insistence on sameness (IS) (Bishop et al., 2013; Bishop, Richler, & Lord, 2006; Richler, Huerta, Bishop, & Lord, 2010).
Research indicates that repetitive behaviors may be among the earliest-emerging signs of autism (Wolff et al., 2014). There is also evidence to suggest that different types of RRB may be predictive of co-occurring mental health problems. For example, children with ASD who demonstrate high levels of ritualistic and sameness behavior have been found to show more severe symptoms of anxiety and depression (Stratis & Lecavalier, 2013). Parents of children and teens also report that RRBs are one of the most challenging features of ASD due to their significant interference with daily life. They can significantly impede learning and socialization by decreasing the likelihood of positive interactions with peers and adults. Given the importance of RRBs as a core feature of ASD, professionals should give increased attention to the assessment and presence of these behaviors, and their impact on the adaptability and psychological well-being of children and youth with ASD (Stratis & Lecavalier, 2013). 
Assessment

Questionnaires are the most frequently used methods of measuring RRBs. For example, the broad-based measures such as the Autism Spectrum Rating Scales (ASRS; Goldstein & Naglieri, 2010) and Social Responsiveness Scale (SRS-2; Constantino & Gruber, 2012) incorporate scales and treatment clusters assessing stereotypical behaviors, sensory sensitivity, and highly restricted interests characteristic of ASD. There are also specialized parent/caregiver questionnaires available that focus solely on restricted and repetitive behaviors and provide a more complete understanding of the impact of RRB factors on adaptive functioning. Of these questionnaires, the most commonly used are the Repetitive Behavior Scale-Revised (RBS-R; Bodfish, Symons, Parker, & Lewis, 2000) and the Repetitive Behavior Questionnaire-2 (RBQ-2; Leekam et al., 2007). Both cover a wide range of repetitive behaviors and were designed as a quantitative index of RRB, rather than relying exclusively on the above referenced broad-based ASD measures to assess RRBs. 
The RBS-R is a parent report of repetitive behaviors in children, adolescents, and adults with ASD. It consists of 43 items and includes the following subscales: Stereotyped Behavior, Self-Injurious Behavior, Compulsive Behavior, Ritualistic Behavior, Sameness Behavior, and Restricted Behavior. For each subscale, the number of items endorsed is computed as well as the severity score for the subscale. On the last question, respondents are asked to consider all of the behaviors described in the questionnaire, and provide a global severity rating.  The RBS-R has been reported to have adequate psychometric properties, and acceptable reliability and validity for each subscale (Bodfish et al., 2000; Boyd et al., 2010; Esbensen, Seltzer, Lam, & Bodfish, 2009; Gabriels, Cuccaro, Hill, Ivers, & Goldson, 2005; Lam & Aman, 2007).
The Repetitive Behavior Questionnaire-2 (RBQ-2; Leekam et al., 2007) is also a parent-completed 20-item questionnaire suitable for children (with or without autism) of all ages. Item responses fall into four groups which correspond to four specific areas: Repetitive Motor Movements, Rigidity/Adherence to Routine, Preoccupation with Restricted Interests, and Unusual Sensory Interests. Questionnaire scores can be added to provide a Total Repetitive Behaviors Score. As with previous research on RRBs, two clusters can be identified: RSMB, which corresponds to repetitive motor movements and unusual sensory interests, and IS, which corresponds to adherence to routine and restricted interests. The reliability and validity of the RBQ-2 has been supported with children and adolescents (Lidstone et al., 2014).
Future Directions

Restricted and repetitive behavior (RRB) is a core diagnostic feature of ASD. Although these behaviors present a major barrier to learning and social adaptation, most of the research on ASD has focused on social and communication deficits, with less attention given to the RRB symptom domain (Boyd, McDonough, & Bodfish, 2012; Leekam, Prior, & Uljarevic, 2011). Further research and is needed to better understand their development, expression, assessment, and related clinical features (e.g., cognitive ability, adaptive functioning, comorbid disorders) (Stratis & Lecavalier, 2013). For example, it is important to understand how RRBs in typical development vary across time in order to compare atypical trajectories in children with ASD across intellectual and adaptive levels. Future research should also be directed to understanding the RRB subtypes and their relationship to comorbid symptoms such as anxiety and depression. 
Compared to the relatively large number of evidence-based, behavioral interventions for the social communication and interaction symptoms of ASD, RRBs are less likely to be included in intervention planning. There is a need to develop evidence-based interventions that are effective in treating the continuum of repetitive behaviors in order to provide support in this domain and improve RRBs before these behaviors become well-established (Leekam et al., 2011). In terms of assessment, measures such as the RBS-R and RBQ-2 should be included in a comprehensive developmental assessment to provide a more complete understanding of specific RRBs and their impact on adaptive functioning, as well as inform intervention selection (see Wilkinson for a description of assessment domains and recommended measures). Lastly, it is important to provide parents with education and training on how to effectively address these inflexible and repetitive patterns of behaviors that affect their everyday lives.
Adapted from Wilkinson, L. A. (2016). A best practice guide to assessment and intervention for autism spectrum disorder in schools. London and Philadelphia: Jessica Kingsley Publishers.


Key References

American Psychiatric Association. (2013). Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (5th ed.) Washington, DC: Author.
Bishop, S.L., Hus, V., Duncan, A., Huerta, M., Gotham, K., Pickles, A., Kreiger, A., Buja, A., Lund, S., Lord, C. (2013). Subcategories of restricted and repetitive behaviors in children with autism spectrum disorders. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 43, 1287-97. doi:  10.1007/s10803-012-1671-0
Bodfish, J.W., Symons, F.J., Parker, D.E., & Lewis, M.H. (2000). Varieties of repetitive behavior in autism: Comparisons to mental retardation. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 30, 237–243.

Boyd, B. A., McDonough, S. G., & and Bodfish, J. W. (2012). Evidence-based behavioral interventions for repetitive behaviors in autism. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 42(6), 1236-1248. doi:10.1007/s10803-011-1284-z
Esbensen, A. J., Seltzer, M., Lam, K., & Bodfish, J. W. (2009). Age-related differences in restricted repetitive behaviors in autism spectrum disorders. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 39, 57–66. doi:10.1007/s10803-008-0599-x
Lam, K. S. L. & M. G. Aman (2007). The Repetitive Behavior Scale-Revised: Independent validation in individuals with autism spectrum disorders. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 37(5): 855-866.
Leekam, S, Tandos, J., McConachie, H., Meins, E., Parkinson, K., Wright, C…Le Couteur, A. (2007). Repetitive behaviours in typically developing 2-year-olds. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 48, 11, 1131-1138.
Leekam, S. R., Prior, M. R., & Uljarevic, M. (2011). Restricted and repetitive behaviors in autism spectrum disorders: A review of research in the last decade. Psychological Bulletin, 137, 562–593. doi: 10.1037/a0023341
Stratis, E. A., & Lecavalier, L. (2013). Restricted and repetitive behaviors and psychiatric symptoms in youth with autism spectrum disorders. Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders, 7, 757–766.
Wolff, J.J., Botteron, K. N., Dager, S.R., Elison, J. T., Estes, A. M., Gu, H…Piven, J. (2014). Longitudinal patterns of repetitive behavior in toddlers with autism. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 55, 945-53. doi: 10.1111/jcpp.12207
Lee A. Wilkinson, PhD, NCSP is a licensed and nationally certified school psychologist, registered psychologist, and certified cognitive-behavioral therapist. He provides consultation services and best practice guidance to school systems, agencies, advocacy groups, and professionals on a wide variety of topics related to children and youth with autism spectrum disorders. Dr. Wilkinson is author of the award-winning books,  A Best Practice Guide to Assessment and Intervention for Autism and Asperger Syndrome in Schools and Overcoming Anxiety and Depression on the Autism Spectrum: A Self-Help Guide Using CBTHe is also editor of a best-selling text in the APA School Psychology Book Series,  Autism Spectrum Disorder in Children and Adolescents: Evidence-Based Assessment and Intervention in Schools. His latest book is A Best Practice Guide to Assessment and Intervention for Autism Spectrum Disorder in Schools (2nd Edition).

© 2017 Lee A. Wilkinson, PhD

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